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02/13/2015  •  Posted By Holly  •  Comments Off on Britt Robertson Talks to Young Hollywood

White Rabbit is a rather dark film with a powerful message. What drew you to the script and to your character, Julie?
-When I first read the script, I thought it was such an interesting story. I was interested in exploring the character of Julie, especially in her arc. She starts off as this outrageous, outspoken girl who is going down the wrong path, then she makes the turn and decides that she wants something better for her life.

The film is set in the south, and you yourself are from the Carolinas. Did you bring any of your experiences growing up in the south to Julie?
-Not necessarily with this project. The Southern lifestyle is really specific and elevated the story because the kind of people that live in this town and what that mindset does to people really drives my character to make a big change. But I don’t know that the Southern setting necessarily had anything to do with the choices that I made based around that.

Julie undergoes quite a transformation in the film, particularly in the way that she looks. Did you work with the designers and makeup artists on the film to transform Julie’s look, and if so, how did you come up with this particular transformation?
-I had some input on her transformation. I was given a very short window to do so. I was there for a week. It was a very limited time. I did know in the back of my head that I wanted it to be drastic and very obvious to the audience that she made this change. The biggest thing was she needed to be very simple by the end and she comes out a better person. She switched to solid, bright, really happy, cheerful, and simple clothing choices and hairstyle.

White Rabbit clearly addresses the problems of bullying and violence in our schools. What advice would you give to those who are currently being bullied?
-It’s a really serious issue. I have a lot of younger brothers and sisters. It is a huge issue, and it can really shape the way these kids learn and develop respect for each other. I think the main thing if you are being bullied is to talk about it. Talk to your parents, talk to teachers and your friends. Try to reach out to people because the more people you have surrounding you and protecting you, the better off you are. Just get people on your team.

You recently wrapped up Tomorrowland, which is based on the land at Disneyland. How much of the actual land makes its way into the film, and do you have a favorite attraction in the real Tomorrowland?
-It is loosely based on the idea of Tomororwland in the theme park. There is not a huge connection. I think when Brad [Bird] and Damon [Lindelof] came to Disney and pitched the idea around something in the theme parks, that’s what kickstarted the idea. We actually did shoot in both Disneyland in California and Disney World in Florida. I love Space Mountain. It’s fantastic.

You also had the chance to work with Brad Bird and George Clooney in the film. As a director, what was he like to work with, and what was it like to work with George Clooney?
-It sort of felt like the first acting experience ever. With Brad, he’s so specific and knows exactly what he wants. He has this movie he’s already planned in his head. Working with him was very technical. I had to learn a new way of taking direction and approaching ideas. It was really a new version of learning how to act and have this relationship with the director. It was a little intimidating working with George, I’m not going to lie, to be the new girl on set. But he was so warm, kind, and normal, eventually I felt comfortable and was able to work with the best of them. He was so generous and helped me along the way with any bumps or any issues I may have had. It was a wonderful experience, and I came out of it learning so much about filmmaking. I’m really grateful for it.

Source: Young Hollywood


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